Nemcsok Farms is a family owned and operated by Evelyne and Michael Nemcsok, and is located 20 km north of Englehart, Ontario, Canada. Our farm consists of 200 + acres that includes woodlot, fields, a sand pit, some wetlands, a vegetable garden, flower beds and gardens, some rocky outcrops, and a nice yard for us to enjoy also. We produce forage and grain crops, vegetables, plants, flowers, firewood and custom plowing, cultivating, seeding and more. Welcome to our family farm! We are located 20 km north of Englehart, Ontario, Canada. Stick around for some gardening tips, DIYs, Recipes, Crafts, and other great ideas for how to use the things around you to create a better, more natural lifestyle. We also offer custom ploughing, seeding, cultivating and more. We sell harvested wild flower seeds collected from our property, as well as birch firewood bundles, wholesale only.

Vegetable Planting Schedule

Here is your vegetable planting schedule.  Having a continuous harvest garden is a nice way to ensure you have a variety of fresh home grown vegetables all season.  In some cases it may mean you get to enjoy your earlier harvests, and plan to preserve the last harvest for the upcoming winter.  I know, I know, it’s still THIS winter. But please, hear me out.

vegetable planting schedule - direct seeding

Vegetable Planting Schedule

You can usually get about 24 weeks of good or at least decent growing weather for a variety of veggies.  There are those that can be direct seeded before the last spring frost, such as peas, radishes, spinach and a few others.  You can pretty much get these seeds started in the ground as soon as your soil is workable. 

Continuous Harvest Chart

 

Click on the image above to get your free pdf. copy of the Continuous Harvest Chart, or click Continuous Harvest Chart

Basically this chart shows you how to stagger your plantings, in order to optimize your harvest.  Your growing season may very well be different, so adjust accordingly. 

For example, if your ground is normally thawed in early April, or even late March, first let’s just say that I am suitably jealous.  Jealousy aside,   keep in mind that you can likely push these dates back a few weeks, and you can be putting your first batch of peas in the garden in the last week of March and then harvesting in the last week of May. 

Make sure you leave enough time at the end of the season to get your last crop out. 

Don’t forget about these other free printables to help keep you on track in your garden this growing season 

We love to hear from you!  Share your thoughts. Ask your questions! 

 

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