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The Best Rhubarb Recipes Collection

Rhubarb Recipe Collection

Rhubarb is the ultimate perennial plant. Not only does it produce deliciously sweet red stalks, it it super easy to care for, has a reliable yield, and comes back year after year, even if you forget about it.  We have our favourite Rhubarb Recipes, and I’ve put them together in an easy to find place for you.  Don’t forget to bookmark it!

Rhubarb Recipe Collection - Cookies, Muffins, Pies, Jams and more

Muffins & Cookies & Jams Rhubarb Recipes

Mini Muffins made with fresh rhubarb and topped with cinnamon sugar make a great snack, and are super tasty!

 

Whole Wheat Rhubarb Muffins – by Mom Vs. The Boys

Lemon Rhubarb Cookies –  by Picklebums

Rhubarb Mini Muffins – by Nemcsok Farms

Rhuberry Jam – by Nemcsok Farms 

 

Homemade Rhuberry Jam Preserved rhubarb and strawberries together in this deliciously sweet homemade jam

 

Crumbles & Crisps & Pies Rhubarb Recipes

 

Fresh Rhubarb and Strawberry Pie With a Beautiful Lattice Top Crust

 

Low Carb Rhubarb Crumble – by Step Away from the Carbs

Spice Rhubarb Apple Crumble – by In The Playroom

Strawberry Rhubarb Crisp – by Family Food and Travel 

Roasted Rhubarb with Cottage Cheese – by New House New Home New Life 

Rhubarb Fool – by Kitchen Counter Chronicles

Rhubarb & Strawberry Pie – by Nemcsok Farms

 

Reasons to love Rhubarb

Rhubarb has a taste that is quite unique. It is perfect for muffins, breads and cakes, as it is not too sweet.  You will find that a lot of recipes using rhubarb also add strawberries.  They go quite well together!

Besides these amazing rhubarb recipes, Rhubarb is a hardy, perennial vegetable, that requires very little care and maintenance.  Try to cut it before it goes to seed, and don’t cut the really small pieces when you do harvest. 

Even in the Northern Ontario climates, you can get at least two, and often three harvests per year.  That is usually enough to stock a freezer. Rhubarb freezes well, it also cans well.  You can mix it with sugar and can it, and use it later on in crumbles, crisps and my favourite cobbler recipe.  

Rhubarb Recipe Collection Pies Cookies Muffins Crumbles and More

What is your favourite rhubarb recipe? Share it on our Facebook Page, or tag us on Instagram @nemcsokfarms

 
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Best Gardening Ideas

Top 5 Gardening Ideas

This is it folks.  Get ready for full on Gardening Season.  The snow it is a melting, and seeds, they need to get sprouting.  To help get you ( and myself too!) off on the right foot, here are the Best Gardening Ideas.

Best Gardening Ideas from Seed Starting and a Composter, to Butterfly Gardens and Vegetables

Best Gardening Ideas

From ideas for Seed Starting to Building a Really Easy Composter Nemcsok Farms has got you covered.  We’ve tackled Butterfly Gardens , Fairy Tale Gardens and Vegetable Gardens!  

I put all of our favourite ideas, chosen by you, in one handy dandy little spot – click through to get to your favourites and what interests you most.

Our Most Popular Gardening Post of All Time

It is of no surprise to me that our visitors find our list of The Easiest Veggies to Grow the most useful item in our gardening section. 

Easiest Veggies You Can Grow - EVER.

Packed full of useful tips and advice on growing some high producing and low maintenance vegetables.  The perfect list for those gardeners who are just starting out, or who are just not going to spend all their time in the garden.  If you’re just starting out, I highly recommend you start here.

A Garden With A Happy Ending

Who doesn’t love a fairy tale?  Well everybody loves our ideas on how to Give Your Garden a Fairy Tale Look, with these suggestions on growing and caring for lupines.  Lupines are a native wildflower to our area and we all know native wildflowers are indeed where it is at.

Give Your Garden a Fairy Tale Look by Planting Lupines

Top 10 Seed Starting Ideas

After day dreaming about your garden all winter, seed starting is really where it all comes to fruition.  I had collected my favourite posts on Seed Starting Ideas and that collection continues to be a favourite for all of our Readers.  

Top Ten Seed Starting Ideas

Everybody wants to Build a Butterfly Garden

Everybody loves butterflies, and why not?  They are amazing and delightful little creatures that can entertain us for entire mornings and afternoons.  They also happen to be some serious pollinators which means having them around your yard, gardens and property will keep things growing! Make you add the creature comforts when Building A Butterfly Garden

How To Build A Butterfly Garden with Flowers and Other Essentials for Butterflies

A No Tools Required Kind of Project

A super easy and super cheap DIY Composter is what finished up the list of our Top 5 Gardening Ideas.  This project is so easy, you won’t even need any tools.  For real. 

Super Easy Super Cheap DIY Composter Pallet Project

And just think – I haven’t even started on our Best Gardening Printables yet!  Maybe next week

 

 

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Vegetable Planting Schedule for Peppers

Vegetable Planting Guide for Tomatoes and Growing Tips for Fresh Garden Peppers

& GROWING TIPS

Now tell me, what is more impressive than someone growing their own peas, corn, and lettuce, and serving it up all fresh and fancy, and all nutritious and stuff?  Give up?  Someone who grows their own peppers!  

Vegetable Planting Guide for Tomatoes and Growing Tips for Fresh Garden Peppers

A PEPPER FIASCO 

I have fond fond memories of my husband trying some crazy stupid hot peppers while on vacation in Mexico, many many moons ago, and frantically washing it down with a margarita.  I also have blazing hot memories of wiping my eyes with my fingers after planting hot pepper seeds. Yes, exactly like you are not supposed to do.  If you’ve never done it – well just don’t.  But also know that there is nothing in this world that compares to it.  Hot peppers in your eyes hurts. Like a lot.

HOW MANY PEPPER SEEDS / PLANTS TO START

Start by determining the space you want to use to grow tomatoes.  You should allow 12 -18″ for every healthy plant.  If you’ve got a 4′ x 4′ space, you’ll have room for 9  plants.  So give yourself 50% more seeds, so in this case you’ll want to have 13 plants.  You will end up thinning out the smallest and sickliest looking seedlings. Therefore you’ll need to start with 39 seeds.  You can usually buy them in packages of 20, 50 and 100.  

VEGETABLE PLANTING SCHEDULE FOR PEPPERS

  • Start seeds indoors 6 to 8 weeks before last spring frost date.    
  • Harden off plants over the course of a week.
  • Till aged manure or compost into your garden soil
  • Put them in a part of your garden where they will have full sun and well-drained soil. 
  • Water the transplants very well.
  • Make sure the pepper plants have really good drainage
  • Stake the plants to support the weight of the peppers 

Vegetable Planting Guide for Tomatoes and Growing Tips for Fresh Garden Peppers

 

GARDEN GROWING TIPS FOR PEPPERS

  • Mulch thickly to retain moisture and regulate soil temperature. They like a lot of water, but need to be in well drained soil.
  • Don’t plant peppers near the beans or kholorabi 
  • Peppers can be grown near Basil, Coriander, Onions, Spinach and Tomatoes
  • Inspect for insect pests regularly.

HARVESTING TIPS FOR PEPPERS

  • Leave your peppers on the vine as long as possible for maximum taste.
  • If your pepper plant still has fruit when the first hard frost threatens, pull up the entire plant and hang it upside down in the basement or garage. Pick peppers as they ripen.
  • To freeze, slice and place in freezer bags or containers. 
  • Wear gloves when handling hot peppers.  For real, I’m not kidding.  See the part about the fiasco above
  • If you end up with an over abundance, make homemade pepper sauce, or salsa! I recommend our Market Garden Salsa, and our Tomato and Pepper Salsa 

Vegetable Planting Guide for Tomatoes and Growing Tips for Fresh Garden Peppers

FIND THIS USEFUL?

Get your printable Vegetable Planting Schedule – for reference and to help keep you on track, and check out these other gardening posts to help you get the most out of your garden. Also, check out our article on the Easiest Veggies to Grow – it’s perfect for anybody just starting out, or who doesn’t necessarily have the time to devout to a garden. 

Starting Seedlings , Laying out your PlotMaintenance PlannersJournalsPlanting Schedules for Direct Seeding, and Planting Schedules for Starting Seeds Indoors and don’t forget our growing tips for cabbage, broccoli lettuce tomatoes and cauliflower.

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Vegetable Planting Schedule for Tomatoes

Vegetable Planting Guide for Tomatoes and Growing Tips for Fresh Garden Tomatoes

& GROWING TIPS

My Dad loved having a potted cherry tomato plant on his doorway, and my Mom is able to create a feast worthy of royalty, with nothing in her fridge besides tomatoes.  Needless to say, they are a part of my heritage.

Vegetable Planting Guide for Tomatoes and Growing Tips for Fresh Garden Tomatoes

SMELLS LIKE A TOMATO 

Homemade Ketchup, Barbecue Sauce, Tomato Sauce and more are right at your fingertips.  Use this Vegetable Planting Schedule for Tomatoes to grow your own tomatoes and you’ll be Blanching Your Own Tomatoes rocking this Perfect Chili too.  You can get a lot of fruit for your labour from even one plant, and these seedlings smell amazing! Almost seems too easy doesn’t it?

HOW MANY TOMATO SEEDS / PLANTS TO START

Start by determining the space you want to use to grow tomatoes.  You should allow 2′ for every healthy plant.  If you’ve got a 4′ x 4′ space, you’ll have room for 4  plants.  So give yourself 50% more seeds, so in this case you’ll want to have 6 plants.  You will end up thinning out the smallest and sickliest looking seedlings. Therefore you’ll need to start with 18 seeds.  You can usually buy them in packages of 20, 50 and 100.  

VEGETABLE PLANTING SCHEDULE FOR TOMATOES

  • Start seeds indoors 6 to 8 weeks before last spring frost date.    
  • Harden off plants over the course of a week.
  • Till aged manure or compost into your garden soil
  • Put them in a part of your garden where they will have full sun and well-drained soil. 
  • Pinch off a few of the lower branches on transplants, and plant the root ball deep enough so that the remaining lowest leaves are just above the surface of the soil.
  • Water the transplants very well.
  • Put in stakes or cages  at the time of planting. Staking keeps developing fruit off the ground, while caging let’s the plant hold itself upright

Vegetable Planting Schedule for Tomatoes plus growing tips

 

GARDEN GROWING TIPS FOR TOMATOES

  • Mulch thickly to retain moisture and regulate soil temperature. They like a lot of water, but need to be in well drained soil.
  • Don’t plant tomatoes near the Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, CabbageCauliflower,Corn or Potatoes
  • Tomatoes can be grown near Asparagus, Basil, Beans, Carrots, Celery, Dill, Lettuce, Melons, Onions, Parsley, Peppers, Radishes, Spinach and Thyme
  • Inspect for insect pests regularly.

HARVESTING TIPS FOR TOMATOES

  • Leave your tomatoes on the vine as long as possible. 
  • If your tomato plant still has fruit when the first hard frost threatens, pull up the entire plant and hang it upside down in the basement or garage. Pick tomatoes as they redden.
  • To freeze, core  tomatoes and place them whole in freezer bags or containers. 
  • If you end up with an over abundance, make homemade tomato sauce, or salsa! I recommend our Market Garden Salsa, and our Tomato and Pepper Salsa 

 

Vegetable Planting Guide for Tomatoes and Growing Tips for Fresh Garden Tomatoes

FIND THIS USEFUL?

Get your printable Planting Schedule -Starting Indoors – for reference and to help keep you on track, and check out these other gardening posts to help you get the most out of your garden. Also, check out our article on the Easiest Veggies to Grow – it’s perfect for anybody just starting out, or who doesn’t necessarily have the time to devout to a garden. 

Starting Seedlings , Laying out your PlotMaintenance PlannersJournalsPlanting Schedules for Direct Seeding, and Planting Schedules for Starting Seeds Indoors and don’t forget our growing tips for cabbage, broccoli lettuce and cauliflower.

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Vegetable Planting Schedule for Lettuce Plus Growing Tips

planting schedule and growing tips for lettuce

& Growing Tips

Lettuce right from the garden is far superior to anything you would buy off a grocery store shelf.  Don’t believe, me, just grow your own.  Not sure where to start?  Read on my friend, read on.

vegetable planting schedule - leaf lettuce

THE PLANT JUST KEEPS GIVING 

Not only can you harvest multiple times from one plant throughout the season, you can use continuous planting all season to get multiple crops.  Lettuce is a cool-season crop that grows well in the spring and fall in most areas. Lettuce seedlings will even tolerate a light frost, but not a harsh wind.  Almost seems too easy doesn’t it?

HOW MANY LETTUCE SEEDS / PLANTS TO START

Start by determining the space you want to use to grow lettuce in.  You can plant your seeds every 4″ and rows 12″ apart.   If you’ve got a 4′ x 4′ space, you’ll have room for 48  plants.  So give yourself 50% more seeds, so in this case you’ll want to have 72 plants.  You will end up thinning out the smallest and sickliest looking seedlings. Therefore you’ll need to start with 78 seeds.  You can usually buy them in packages of 20, 50 and 100.  

VEGETABLE PLANTING SCHEDULE FOR LETTUCE

  • Start seeds indoors 4 to 6 weeks before last spring frost date for earliest crop, and remember, you can plant lettuce seeds directly in your garden as soon as the soil is workable.  
  • Harden off plants over the course of a week.
  • Till aged manure or compost into your garden soil
  • Put them in a part of your garden where they will have a bit of shade
  • Water the transplants very well.
  • Add mulch to conserve moisture.

schedule and growing tips for lettuce

GARDEN GROWING TIPS FOR LETTUCE

  • Choose a spot that has some shade – the lettuce leaves need reprieve from the hot sun.
  • Mulch thickly to retain moisture and regulate soil temperature. They like a lot of water, but need to be in well drained soil.
  • Lettuce doesn’t do so well near broccoli, but you can put a row of lettuce between your brussels sprouts and you cabbage.  
  • Lettuce can be grown near chives, garlic, tomatoes and cucumbers.  
  • Take care not to disturb the roots

HARVESTING TIPS FOR LETTUCE

  • You can harvest the outer leaves from the lettuce to enjoy, while leaving the rest of the plant to keep growing.
  • When the plant is entirely ready, you’ll want to cut the whole plant from the ground.
  • Cut heads from the plant taking a good part of the stem as well
  • Fresh lettuce will keep well in the refrigerator for one to two weeks

schedule and growing tips for lettuce

Find This Useful?

Get your printable Planting Schedule -Starting Indoors – for reference and to help keep you on track, and check out these other gardening posts to help you get the most out of your garden

Starting Seedlings , Laying out your PlotMaintenance PlannersJournalsPlanting Schedules for Direct Seeding, and Planting Schedules for Starting Seeds Indoors and don’t forget our growing tips for cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower.

 

 

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The 7 Easiest Veggies You Can Grow

Easiest Veggies You Can Grow - EVER.
Gardening doesn’t work for everyone all year round. But there is hope! Here are some of the easiest veggies you can grow. Ever.
 
Easiest Veggies You Can Grow - EVER.
 

If you have the right soil, the perfect climate, all the time in the world, etc… you can grow anything and you can grow it perfectly.

That said, those items mentioned above are all hot commodities, and hey! Who has all the time in the world, and the perfect soil, the perfect climate, and so on and so on….?

NOBODY!

Here is a small collection of veggies that are super duper easy to grow, require the least amount of maintenance, and with just an itsy bitsy bit of care, can give you wonderful yields.
 

Easiest Veggies You Can Grow

Radishes

Radishes can be directed seeded into your garden as soon as the soil is workable.  They prefer a softer soil, but even in a harder clay they can grow, just not as big obviously.  They are quick to harvest, which also means that you can stagger your radish plantings for continuous harvests, well into the fall.  See the Continuous Harvest Planner I shared with you a couple of weeks ago.
 
Rhubarb, along with radishes, beets, bush beans, pumpkins, peas and cucumbers are the easiest veggies to grow for yourself!
Easiest Veggies You Can Grow - EVER.

Rhubarb

 

Rhubarb is awesome. It will come to maturity twice a year, and all you have to do is cut it.  If you happen to forget to cut it, fear not, in most cases it will go to seed, and then grow back the next year, after a dormant winter season. I wouldn’t let it do this too many years in a row however…

With plants like rhubarb that have giant leaves, they are their own weed control.  They rarely have to compete with other plants, as the leaves shade out any other growth.  While talking about the leaves though – beware! Rhubarb leaves are poisonous.  Handle with care, and don’t eat them.  (Mix them up in some water though to make your own pesticide).

Beets

Like radishes, beets also can be planted early in the spring, and have a fairly short growing season.  They will require a wee bit of weeding until their greens are established – but they are known to be forgiving of the occasionally forgetful gardener. 
Pumpkins, along with radishes, beets, bush beans, rhubarb, peas and cucumbers are the easiest veggies to grow for yourself!

Pumpkins

 

Pumpkins are quick to germinate, and quick to establish.  They require a fairly long growing season if you’re attempting to grow a Jack O’ Lantern size pumpkin, but they are very very forgiving. 

They have great big leaves that shade out competing weeds, and they can survive the cooler temperatures that come in the fall.  Pumpkins can also survive the first light frost of the season, but nothing much more than that.

Easiest Veggies You Can Grow - EVER.

Bush Beans

Other than a small trellis ( and by this a light rope strung across two sticks for the length of the row will suffice) bush beans need very little care.  Plant the seeds, string something for them to grow with, like the trellis, and then harvest them when they are ready. 

Bush beans can be a really satisfying crop, because the plants will continue to produce more and more beans as you pick them.  If you use a trellis, the bush varieties also provide shade to other competitors, and therefore once they are established and standing, require little to no weeding.

Peas

Peas are pretty easy to grow also, for the same reason that bush beans are easy to grow.  Depending on the variety of peas, you may require a more heavy duty type of trellis.  You will get out of your plants what you put into them. 

Peas will also provide the weed control by shading out smaller plants once established, although not quite as effectively as the beans. 

Cucumbers, along with radishes, beets, bush beans, pumpkins, peas and pumpkins are the easiest veggies to grow for yourself!
Easiest Veggies You Can Grow - EVER.

Cucumbers

 

Cucumbers are perhaps the easiest of easy to grow.  They have a quick germination time, mature rapidly, have plants that produce more cucumbers as you pick the ripe ones, and have the big shade leaves for weed control.

And I mean, really. Pickles.  Need I say more?

Don’t forget about these other free printables to help keep you on track in your garden this growing season 

 
Easiest Veggies You Can Grow - EVER.

We love to hear from you!  Share your thoughts. Ask your questions! 

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Gardening Books for Beginners and Experts

11 of the best gardening books for beginners and experts alike. Vegetables, flowers and herb gardening, container and square foot gardening and journalling.
There are a multitude of things to consider when planning out your garden. Generally speaking soil types, as well as sun vs. shade, and climate are top of the list.  However, plant hardiness, compatibility with neighbour plants etc are also key factors. Whether it be flowers, herbs or vegetables, knowledge is power, and knowledge often comes in books.  Here is a list of gardening books that you will find helpful, and informative. 
 
(For your convenience, this post contains affiliate links.)

11 of the best gardening books for beginners and experts alike. Vegetables, flowers and herb gardening, container and square foot gardening and journalling.

Gardening Books for Beginners and Experts

Perennials for Ontario by Alison Beck

This is the most used book in my garden library.  First, it’s packed with great information on perennials for Ontario, including but not limited to dividing plants.  Second, there are tips for what pests to watch out for. Third, and perhaps my favourite part of the book, the chart that allows you to find perennials by colour, height, hardiness and bloom season.

Annuals for Ontario by Alison Beck

Normally I’m not a big fan of annuals, but when you have a spot where you may want to experiment with colour and blossom variety – knowing what annuals have to offer is key.  

Flower Gardening by Reader’s Digest

 
For both the beginner and experienced gardener,  this book includes the newest flower species, plus the latest trends in flower gardening, including butterfly gardens, wedding bouquets, and dwarf and miniature gardens

 

A-Z Encyclopedia of Garden Plants by Christopher Brickel

Comprehensive, detailed, and beautifully illustrated with full-color photographs, this alphabetical guide to some 15,000 ornamental plants is an essential reference for all gardeners and horticulturists

Canadian Encyclopedia of Gardening by DK

This  comprehensive gardening reference is packed with helpful advice. From  the growing popularity of green roofs and crevice gardening to an  expanded section on how to grow fruit and vegetables in containers, this  fully revised encyclopedia includes new photography and step-by-step  techniques.

Canadian Vegetable Gardening Guide by Douglas Green

Filled with  information on planting, growing and harvesting more than 50 vegetables and herbs, plus it includes full-color images as well as helpful maps and charts.

All New Square Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholemew

In this new volume, you’ll find discussions on one of the most popular gardening trends today: vertical gardening, as well as making gardening fun for kids, plus an expanded section on pest control. Rich with new full-color images and updated tips for selecting materials.

Seed to Seed by Suzanne Ashworth

A complete seed-saving guide that describes specific techniques for saving the seeds of 160 different vegetables. This book contains detailed information about each vegetable, including its botanical classification, flower structure and means of pollination.  Also, required population size, techniques for hand-pollination, and the proper methods for harvesting, drying, cleaning, and storing the seeds.

Container Herb Gardening by Rosita Burnette

In Container Herb Gardening, you’re given you all of the information that you need to get started with container herb gardening in your home or apartment. Not only supplies you’ll need and tips to get started, but also how to find the best herbs to grow.  

Herbs: the Complete Gardener’s Guide by Patrick Lima

 

Photographs and watercolor illustrations capture all the beauty and detail of these fascinating and practical plants, and the entertaining text is chock-full of clear information, helpful advice and wry anecdotes.

A Gardener’s Journal by Lee Valley Tools

A ten year chronicle style journal packed with extras.  This is totally worth the price, and you can and will keep it forever.

 11 of the best gardening books for beginners and experts alike. Vegetables, flowers and herb gardening, container and square foot gardening and journalling.

See all of our gardening posts here and don’t forget to get your printable Planting Schedule -Starting Indoors – for reference and to help keep you on track, and check out these other gardening posts to help you get the most out of your gardenStarting Seedlings , Laying out your Plot, Maintenance Planners, Journals, Planting Schedules for Direct Seeding, and Planting Schedules for Starting Seeds Indoors  

What are your favourite go to gardening books?